Schmidt and Stenlund Genealogy

Discovering our family roots from the 1500 century to modern times

Ernest* Mason Satow

Male 1843 - 1929  (86 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    All

  • Name Ernest* Mason Satow 
    Born 30 Jun 1843  Clapton, London, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Occupation British scholar, diplomat and Japanologist 
    Died 26 Aug 1929  Ottery St Mary, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I7729  Schmidt
    Last Modified 9 May 2015 

    Father Hans David Christoph Satow,   b. 18 Feb 1801, Wismar, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Apr 1874, Sidmouth, Devon, UK Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years) 
    Mother Margaret* Mason,   b. 1812, Hoxton, Middlesex, UK Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. ?? Sep 1899, Hackney, Middlesex, UK Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years) 
    Family ID F2787  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Takeda* Kane 
    Children 
     1. Eitaro* Takeda Satow,   b. 1872, Japan Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Hisayoshi* Takeda Satow,   b. 2 Mar 1883, Japan Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Jun 1972  (Age 89 years)
    Last Modified 27 Dec 2013 
    Family ID F2789  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • THE FAMILY CHRONICLE OF THE ENGLISH SATOWS

      By Ernest Satowhttp://www.dhs.kyutech.ac.jp/~ruxton/The%20Family%20Chronicle%20of%20the%20English%20Satows.htm



      From Britain & Japan: Biographical Portraits, Volym 2by Ian Hill Nish

      It is clear that Cholmondeley saw Takeda Hisayoshi (1883-1972), Satow’s younger son, relatively frequently from 1900 onwards, just before Satow left Japan. While he was minister in Japan, it would appear that Satow looked to Archdeacon A.C. Shaw, the then Chaplain at the British Legation and a resident in Tokyo since 1873, for any help he might require. In March 1897, for instance, Satow noted in his diary: ‘to Shaw & settled with him about Hisakichi [sic] going to live with him after Easter’. Entry for 23 March 1897, Satow Diaries microfilm PRO 30-005 (PRO 30/33/16/1). However, after Satow was translated to the Peking legation, the responsibility of keeping an eye of Takeda Hisayoshi and his mother fell to Cholmondeley. During the mid-1900s, Takeda Hisayoshi was studying in Sapporo (and was furnished by Cholmondeley with introductions to Archdeacon John Batchelor), but Takeda always made a point to have lunch with Cholmondeley or even, on occasion, apparently attend a service at St Barnabas’ when he was back in Tokyo. Cholmondeley had less to do with Takeda Eitaro, the older son, because he emigrated to the United States, but it would seem that Cholmondeley thought quite highly of him. In July 1909 Cholmondeley wrote to Satow that ‘I will be hoping to see Hisayoshi some time this summer. His mother is very constant Church [St Barnabas’, Ushigome]. I feel sure that she finds help and pleasure in coming’. Cholmondeley to Satow, 23 July 1909, Satow Papers, PRO 30/33/12/4 2679. As a church member, Cholmondeley would see Takeda’s mother every week, for a brief biographical sketch of Takeda Hisayoshi, who became a botanist and also a founding member of the Japan Alpine Club, sec Konsaisu Nihon Jinmei Jiten, Tokyo: Sanscido 1990 edition, p. 756.